Weeks 3&4 – Rainbow Shawl Crochet Along

Hello and welcome to the #rainbowshawlcal I hope you are enjoying it! There are some videos to help you over on IGTV . The first weeks of this CAL are also available on my blog here: #rainbowshawlcal weeks 1 & 2

Row 5: chain 1, ^*sc in next stitch, chain 2, skip 2 stitches* repeat from * 3 more times, sc, skip 1 stitch. Repeat the whole thing from ^ 8 times and sc into the final stitch (no skipped stitch on the very last repeat). (You should now have 45 2ch spaces) Break off yarn but don’t rejoin as we will use a new colour for the next row.

Row 6: join orange yarn (or your choice of colour) to the top of the chain at the right hand side of your work and ch3. 3tr in each 2 chain space to the end, as you reach the stitch markers move them up and place them in the middle of your current 3tr cluster. (45 3tr clusters) Break off yarn and reattach to the top of your 3 chain at the other end.

Row 7: ch 1, *sc into the space before next 3tr cluster, ch2*.
This is the pattern, repeat to end except when you get to a cluster with a stitch marker ch3 rather than ch2.
If the above is to vague for you then here it is written out: repeat from * 3 more times then sc, ch3. Repeat the whole thing 8 more times.
Sc into last tr in the last cluster. Break off yarn and reattach to the top of your 3 chain at the other end.

Row 8: ch 3, 3tr cluster in each ch space (chsp) until you reach a stitch marker. In the chsp above each stitch marker do 3tr, ch1, 3tr (so there are two clusters rather than the usual one). Move stitch marker up to between these two clusters. Break off yarn after the last cluster and rejoin to the top of the chain at the other end. (53 clusters)

Row 9: ch3, *tr in space before next cluster, ch2* repeat 52 more times, tr in top of final tr of the previous row. (53 chsps) Break off yarn and rejoin to the top of the chain at the other end.

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#rainbowshawlcal weeks 1 & 2

Hello and welcome to the #rainbowshawlcal I’m hosting this mystery crochet along on instagram but thought I’d post the first couple of weeks here as well for those who don’t use instagram.

I am using british crochet terminology, here is a handy list of translations for those of you who prefer US terms: http://www.simplycrochetmag.co.uk/2013/07/04/uk-and-us-crochet-conversion-chart/

Foundation row: Chain 75 (72 stitches plus turning chain).

Row 1: starting at the 4th chain from the hook *1 tr into each of the next 7 stitches, 3tr into next stitch placing a stitch marker in the middle stitch* repeat from * to * 8 more times. (91 stitches, including the top of the turning chain)
Break off yarn and reattach to top of turning chain at other end (we are going to work all our rows with the right side facing us, do not weave in ends, leave about 15 cm of yarn).

Row 2: Chain 3, *3tr into next stitch, skip 2, 3tr, skip2, 3tr, skip1, 3tr into stitch that has stitch marker (move stitch marker into middle stitch of this tr), skip1* repeat 8 times, single tr into the last stitch (36 3tr clusters, plus starting chain and single tr). Break off yarn and attach at other end to the top of the chain 3.

Row 3: Chain 3, 3tr into the space before the next tr cluster of the previous row. Repeat 3 tr clusters in each space. Finish with 2 tr in space before final single tr. (36 clusters plus 2tr and turning ch.) Break off yarn and attach at other end to top of chain 3.

Row4: ch3, *tr into the top of the next 12 stitches 2 tr in the space before the next cluster (this is above a stitch marker – move the stitch marker to between these two trs)* repeat 8 times. (126 trs, plus turning chain)Break off yarn and attach at other end.

 

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Please do join us by sharing your project on instagram with #rainbowshawlcal – here’s a link to what’s been shared so far – https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/rainbowshawlcal/

Star stitch marker pattern

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I’ve been busy making stitch markers for my #rainbowshawlcal which runs July 6th – October over on my instagram account. I’m having loads of fun with them and here I’m going to share my pattern for this star.

Make a magic loop.
5dc into magic loop, Ss to join.
2dc in each DC around.
*DC, DC 3tr DC* repeat 5 times. Ss to join and fasten off.

Add a twist of wire or a bent paper clip to the top.

That’s it! really easy and quick to make. I made mine with paintbox cotton DC yarn but any cotton yarn would work. Let me know how you get on 😉

Fixing crochet without frogging

I’ve been making a seaside stash busting blanket as part of the the cal from the wonderful coastal crochet (take a look at her blog and join in here). I’m really loving the cal and my blanket but there was one thing…

One row that was the wrong colour and really bugging me. So I decided I just had to change that row for a different colour. But by the time I decided I was going to change it, I’d done dozens more rows and I didn’t want to rip back all of that crochet. And then I read about a way to fix up mistakes in knitting without frogging and I though if it works for knitting, why not crochet? So I played around a bit and I found a way!

Here’s how I did it. These instructions assume a row of treble stitches, but can be modified for other stitches.

Starting with some crochet and one row is a colour you’d like to change – here it’s the white row – I’m showing the front and back so that you can compare how both sides look before and after. Left is the front, right is the back.

Pic on the left is the front (right side), pic on the right is the back.

The first step is to anchor the new coloured yarn. Put your hook through the loop where the wrong coloured yarn is joined – see picture below.

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Put a loop of new yarn over your hook and pull it through to join the new yarn.

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Once the new yarn is attached make two chains (picture below).

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Now is the fiddly bit – you’ll get it and with a bit of practise it’ll seem easier I promise. You need to poke your hook through the two loops where the background colour goes around the top of the first stitch you are replacing. Your hook is following the old yarn you want to remove. If you can’t get the hook in then try going down a hook size.

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One you hook is there then loop the yarn over

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And pull the yarn through – you’ve now begun to attach your new colour to the row above!

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Pull your yarn through the remaining loops.

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Now there is one loop left on your hook and you have completed the first replacement stitch!

Next we have to find the right place to put our hook to start the next stitch. See the picture below, we place the hook as if we were crocheting into the next stitch in the row below the row we want to replace. Actually that’s exactly what we are doing!IMG_2079

From here we loop the yarn over, then pull it back through, after that it should look like the image below.

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Yarn over …

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And pull that loop through the first two loops as if starting a treble stitch (or US dc). Two loops are left on the hook.

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Before we can yarn over pull through those two loops to finish our treble stitch we need to attach this stitch into the base of the stitch from the row above. See below picture for where to put your hook and remember that we are following where the ‘wrong’ coloured yarn is joined to the row above.

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So hook through here …

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Yarn over

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Pull new yarn through the loops you picked up from the row above.

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And through the next loop of new yarn so that there are two loops of new yarn left on your hook.

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Pull through the next loop so that there is one loop left and you have finished the second stitch. It’ll get easier now as you get the hang of this!

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Start with a yarn over and put your hook through the base of the next stitch.

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Loop over and pull through two loops to begin the treble stitch. Join the bottom of the stitch above before you finish the treble.

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Keep going, you can do this! Don’t forget to join the bottom of each stitch from the row above.

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Once you finish the last but one stitch you may need to join into the top of the turning chain (depending on which side you started with).

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As usual, yarn over then put your hook through the loop at the top of the old stitch, following the ‘wrong’ yarn.

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Complete half your treble stitch and then join to the base of the stitch above.

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Pull through all loops to complete your final treble and give yourself a big pat on the back. You did it! Break of yarn, secure and weave in ends as usual.

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This is what the right side looks like. Can you see that there is a row of what looks like chain stitch across the top of the replaced row? Think of it as a feature 😉 or read on to find out how to get rid of it.

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Turn your crochet over and take a look at the wrong side. The old yarn is still there and it’s time to get rid of it. Put your scissors very carefully between the old and new yarn and cut ONLY the old yarn.

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Cut the old yarn and then pull it all out. We don’t need that wrong coloured yarn anymore!

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Once you rip out all the old yarn it should look something like this. There should not be any unattached loops hanging down from the row above.

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This is the right side with the slip stitch line.

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And this is the ‘wrong’ side without that funny line. So if you don’t want to see that line just turn your work over before you start so that you are working on the wrong side and the line will be hidden at the back.

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And that’s it! I hope you love your new colour!

Daisy chain headband crochet pattern

I’m trying out a few different things as I figure out what direction I want to go in. This week I’ve tried writing and publishing a crochet pattern. It’s a quick to make daisy chain headband, perfect for flower girls or dressing up. I started with a pile of these little daisies.IMG_0277

And then stitched them all together to make a lovely headband. The wool I’ve used (Stylecraft special DK acrylic) gives a stretchy result which works well in a headband. IMG_0295

Writing and publishing the pattern was easier than I expected. Here is the pattern for my Daisy chain headband.